solving global water challenges

Water Engineering

Water Crisis Facts

The water crisis is the #1 global risk, based on impact to society.

World Economic Forum. (2015). Global Risks 2015 Report.

1 in 9 people do not have access to safe and clean drinking water.

Based on 87% of the global population using improved sources. Found in WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. "Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water 2010."

783 million people do not have access to clean and safe water. 37% of those people live in Sub-Saharan Africa.

WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. "Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water 2010."

solving global water challenges

Twice the population of the United States lives without access to safe water.

World Health Organization and UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP). (2015) Progress on Drinking Water and Sanitation, 2015 Update and MDG Assessment. United States Census Bureau Estimates. (2015). United States and World Population Clock.

Globally, 1/3 of all schools lack access to safe water and adequate sanitation.

World Health Organization and UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP). (2015) Progress on Drinking Water and Sanitation, 2015 Update and MDG Assessment.

solving global water challenges

1 out of 3 people worldwide do not have access to a sanitary toilet. In fact, more people have access to a cell phone than a toilet.

World Health Organization and UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP). (2015) Progress on Drinking Water and Sanitation, 2015 Update and MDG Assessment. United States Census Bureau Estimates. (2015). United States and World Population Clock.

Water-related diseases mainly affect children. In fact, 443 million school days are lost each year due to water-related diseases.

United Nations Development Programme. "Human Development Report 2006: Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty and the Global Water Crisis." 2006.

solving global water challenges

Over half of the developing world's primary schools don't have access to water and sanitation facilities. Without toilets, girls often drop out at puberty.

UNICEF. "Water, Sanitation and Hygiene" Updated May 2010.

84% of the people who don't have access to improved water live in rural areas, where they live principally through subsistence agriculture.

WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. "Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water 2010."

64% (almost two-thirds) of households rely on women to get the family's water when there is no water source in the home. Women around the world spend an average of 6 hours per day collecting water.

WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. "Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water 2010."

solving global water challenges

Girls under the age of 15 are twice as likely as boys to be the family member responsible for fetching water.

WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. "Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water 2010."

The United Nations estimates that Sub-Saharan Africa alone loses 40 billion hours per year collecting water; the same as an entire year's labor in all of France.

United Nations Development Programme. "Resource Guide on Gender and Climate Change." 2009.

solving global water challenges

In developing countries, as much as 80% of illnesses are linked to poor water and sanitation conditions.

United Nations. Statement by Secretary General Koffi Annan. June 2003.

Half of the world's hospital beds are filled with people suffering from a water-related disease.

United Nations Development Programme. "Human Development Report 2006: Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty and the Global Water Crisis." 2006.
solving global water challenges