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Globalization

Globalization

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In an increasingly interconnected world, where global commerce prevails, this theme helps you understand and succeed in this complex world.

GenEd Requirement Abbreviations

SS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
HUM - Humanities & The Arts
WCC - Western/Comparitive Cultures

NW - Non-Western Cultures
US - US Minority Cultures
LibEd - Liberal Education


All courses listed can be used for Free Electives.
Outstanding instructors are from the List of Teachers Ranked As Excellent.

Course # Course Name Instructor Satisfies Hours
CMN 232

Intro to Intercultural Comm

Introduction to the study of intercultural communication in a variety of contexts, including domestic and international; examines theory and research to explain what happens when people from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds interact. Requires students to think critically about the ways in which "taken-for-granted" ways of thinking, acting, and interacting are culturally specific.

SS,
NW,
LibEd

3

CWL 114

Global Consciousness and Literature

Exploration of the cultural and historical roots of globalization and the development of global consciousness from ancient Greece to the present, as reflected primarily in literature, but also with reference to historiography, cartography, religion, art, politics, economics, and popular culture. Course materials including literary texts, articles, historical accounts, political tracts, films, and paintings focus on the mutual perception of, and historical relationships among Europe, the Arab world, Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

NW,
WCC,
HUM

3

ECON 220

International Economic Principles

Principles-level course in international economics for non-majors. The first half of course, international trade, covers such topics as comparative advantage, protectionism (tariff and nontariff), impact on income distribution, and industrial policies. The second half, international finance, covers topics such as balance of payments, exchange-rate determination, currency crises, dollarization, and macroeconomic policy in an open economy. Issues relating to globalization will be covered in both halves.
Pre-req: ECON 101

LibEd

3

ESE 106

Geographies of Globalization

A survey of major world regions by systematically considering five themes: environment, population and settlement patterns, cultural coherence and diversity, geopolitical fragmentation and unity, and economic and social development. While examining the persistence of unique regions, the course will both scale up to global linkages and scale down to place-specific impacts of globalization processes. Same as ESE 106.

SS,
WCC,
NW

3

GEOG 101

Global Development&Environment

Examines the manner in which environmental and cultural factors promote and inhibit change in developing countries (i.e., India, Iran, Egypt, Nigeria, China, Kenya, Brazil, Venezuela, Guatemala); makes comparisons between these countries and others in both the developing and the developed world.

SS,
NW,
LibEd

3

GEOG 105

The Digital Earth

Geospatial technologies such as global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS) are becoming increasingly important tools in research and policy arenas and in everyday life. This course will provide an introduction to these emerging technologies and to the principles of mapping science that underpin them. At the same time, the course will explore how these innovative technologies are changing the spaces and places around us, including how we interact with the environment and each other. Lab exercises provide hands-on experience in collecting and mapping geospatial information, interpreting digital imagery and the Earth's environments, and critically thinking about the social implications of the digital Earth.

SS,
LibEd

3

GLBL 100

Intro to Global Studies

Foundation course for understanding a range of contemporary issues and learning to analyze them from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students consider globalizing trends within themes of wealth and poverty; population, cultures, and human rights; environment and sustainability; and governance, conflict, and cooperation. Course objectives are to enhance student knowledge of human cultures, their interactions and impacts on the world; develop student skills for successfully negotiating realities of contemporary societies; and promote student values for global learning, diversity, and sustainable futures.

SS

3

GLBL 298

Discovering Sys of Caribbean

Seminars introduce students to aspects of globalization through a case study of a particular location abroad. On campus, students explore historical and contemporary aspects of the location abroad to prepare for their field visit. Abroad, students engage with local resources and people to better understand how the local site contributes to and is impacted by relevant global processes under focus. Course activities will include a field site visit abroad, discussions, lectures, short essays, student presentation, and final projects. Topics vary according to site location and instructor expertise.

OUTSTANDING INTRUCTORS
E. Balci,
Y. Kedem,
M. Mishra,
K. Salo,
H. Silverman

LibEd

3

HIST 100

Global History

Broad introduction to global history, by exploring the global structures and transnational forces that have shaped human history, from the emergence of agriculture and urban centers to our contemporary global village.

HUM,
NW,
WCC

3

PS 241

Comp Politics in Dev Nations

Provides comparative and historical insights into the problems affecting the developing world by examining social, economic and political changes in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

SS,
NW,
LibEd

3

PS 280

Intro to Intl Relations

Structure and processes of international relations, trends in international politics, and the future of the international system.

OUTSTANDING INTRUCTORS
R. Hendrickson,
J. Miller,
P. Diehl,
L. Hastings

SS,
LibEd

3

SPAN 232

Spanish in the Community

Through community-based learning, this course introduces students to Spanish-speaking communities in the Champaign-Urbana area, focuses on issues of particular interest to the local Hispanic community, helps develop contextualized oral proficiency and facilitates student civic engagement. Active student reflection is structured throughout the course. Meets two hours a week in class and two hours a week in community-based service work. In their interactions with community members and organizations students both learn from and contribute to the community. Prerequisite: SPAN 208 with at least a B or consent of instructor.

Hannah R. recommends this course: “This course is cool because it allows you to use your Spanish skills to engage in the Champaign-Urbana community, which is a great experience that a lot of U of I students miss.”

3