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2013 Hall of Fame

The Engineering at Illinois Hall of Fame recognizes Illinois engineering alumni, and others affiliated with the College, who have significant achievements in leadership, entrepreneurship, and innovation of great impact to society. Each year the college will honor these remarkable accomplishments by inducting a class of honorees into the Engineering at Illinois Hall of Fame.

2013 Hall of Fame Inductees

Sidney D. Drell

Sidney D. Drell

  • MS Physics, 1947
  • PhD Physics, 1949
  • Honorary Degree University of Illinois at Chicago, 1981

For pioneering contributions to elementary particle physics and for applying fundamental physics principles to inform public policy in national security and intelligence.

William J. Fry

William J. Fry

BS Pennsylvania State University, 1948

Pioneer in the field of therapeutic ultrasound who first used computers in diagnostic ultrasonography and neurosonic medical imaging to detect disease.
Donald W. Hamer

Donald W. Hamer

  • BS Ceramic Engineering, 1945
  • MBA University of Chicago, 1951
  • BS Pennslyvannia State University, 1968

Scientist, Entrepreneur, Philanthropist, whose contributions to thick-and thin-film technology have made a significant impact in biomedical, communications, aerospace, and defense industries.

Fontaine K. Richardson

Fontaine K. Richardson

  • BS University of Arkansas, 1963
  • MS University of Arkansas, 1964
  • PhD Computer Science, 1968

Early leader, outstanding innovator and entrepreneur in the CAD/CAM industry, who redefined how we conceptualize, design, and produce millions of products.

Donald R. Scifres

Donald R. Scifres

  • BS Purdue, 1968
  • MS Electrical Engineering, 1970
  • PhD Electrical Engineering, 1972
Global business and technology visionary whose achievements in semiconductor laser research and commercialization revolutionized the optical communications and materials processing industry.
Charles P. Slichter

Charles P. Slichter

  • AB Harvard, 1946
  • MA Harvard, 1947
  • PhD Harvard, 1949
For establishing nuclear magnetic resonance as a powerful tool to elucidate the structure of materials and using it to make fundamental discoveries in physics and chemistry that have enabled a host of modern technologies.